08. May 2017 · Write a comment · Categories: writing · Tags: ,

It’s been over two months since I posted here, ironically about writing every day – or not, so maybe I should put a couple of words down so this site doesn’t atrophy.

And I have been writing.

A screenplay adaptation of the collaborative YA Fantasy “Into Tordon” is close to complete (as complete as any writing is) and ready to send to the world. I’m working on a screenplay adaptation for my second Mac D book, “A Step Too Far”, and writing the first draft of the third Mac D mystery (so far untitled) that is exciting me very much. I’m also mapping out two more Matt Daly thrillers. One is a sequel to “Target: Australia” with Matt and George on their own, no CIA help, abandoned in the Outback, and the other is sort of an origin story – how Matt got to where he is, how he met George, what motivates him to fight terrorists, even though he’s just a telecoms engineer.

So.

Write every day. Assuming “writing” includes sitting on the sofa, watching The Voice with a glass of scotch in your hand.

So write. Now.

 

Bollocks.

Today I wrote nothing. Other than this post and some work emails and a text to my son checking if he wanted a kebab while I was out. (Of course he did.)

But it could be argued that I was writing, since I’ve spent a goodly portion of my day trying to break the story for number 13, the as yet untitled follow up to “A Step Too Far”. P.I. Mac D is back and he’s got a serious problem. I’m pretty sure. I haven’t quite figured that out yet. He might actually be okay.

I’ve got a broad brush view of the beginning, middle and end of the tale. Have a neat little subplot that will pay off nicely and introduce a new character that will be handy in future books. But I’m still stuck. There are some late Second Act things that aren’t clear to me. And until I get unstuck, the “writing” part of this writing ain’t gonna happen. Instead, I’ll wander around, in a seeming daze, working through tons of scenarios until the right one drops in my lap.

So you don’t have to “write” every day, but by all means, keep working on what you’re working on. Not “writing” is a horrible idea.

A long, long time ago (in writing terms) I modified an existing Scrivener template to the 4-part (three act) story structure I use and left it sit here for free.

It’s still free. (And sometime in the next whenever I’ll post the mini-movie structure and associated template.)

That page [you can find it here] is a popular visit. Thanks for stopping by and I hope it helps you even a little bit.

The thing is, two or three times a week the “right click this link and save the file in a location” is “left clicked” and the visitor (it might have been you!) gets an xml page on their screen that looks something like:

<?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″ standalone=”no”?> <ScrivenerTemplate Version=”1.0″> <Title>Novel(with4Parts)v2.1</Title> <Description>Provides compile settings for creating a 4-part novel Character and location sketch sheets are also included. This template is designed for novels that are broken into parts as well as chapters. A list of questions that should be answered before writing is also included.</Description> <Category>Fiction</Category> <ImageName>TemplateGenericText</ImageName> <ProjectZipData>504b03040a0000000000d5b01b490000000000000000000000000f yada yada yada.

Don’t be that person. It’ll frustrate you and the file won’t do what you want it to do.

Right click, my friends. Right click.

On February 10th, Mac Durridge returns.

About a year ago he appeared, fully formed, on the Central Coast of New South Wales. An ex-Cop (not entirely by choice) he tracks down missing people, runs the odd security job and, once in a reluctant while, gets involved in something big.

Last time, in Mac D: Private Investigator, Mac found himself in the middle of a bank job. Literally in the middle. Framed for killing the bank security guard and being a part of the $4,000,000 robbery, Mac had to evade the law while sorting out exactly what happened.

It’s four (literal) months later now, and Mac is recovering from the damage inflicted on his aging body. Then one of the real antagonists from the bank robbery is killed and a local innocent is framed.

That’s a step too far for Mac, and even if it kills him, he has to make things right.

Preorder now at iTunes and Amazon (here, for Australia and here for Canada) for a Feb 10 release.

And if you haven’t read the original Mac D, it’s currently available at all e-store for $0.99 until Feb 10th.

 

Pick up the original now and preorder number two.

Now if you’ll excuse me, the plot for number three needs a bit of work.

It’s been a year, hasn’t it?

The Force Awakens *AND* Rogue One? Damn.

Relax. I know Force was released in December last year, but I didn’t see it until January.

And they bracketed all that other crap happened, culminating in the Electoral College confirming Donald “J is for Jenius” Trump President-Elect. As a Canadian-Australian living on the other side of the world, I am filled with conflicting feelings.

First, immense relief that he’s not *my* president.

And second, countering that, immense terror that the Donald will continue with his toddler-like attention to the world around him, piss off China, start necking with Putin and sell NATO down the river.

The China one is the scariest. Where I’m sitting, an unleashed China starts taking what and whoever it wants, and we’re not that far away from them.

But I shouldn’t worry, right? Trum is, like, a smart guy.

Get’s his intelligence briefings from an e-General who swears there are Arabic signs along the Mexico-US border telling the ISIS travellers which path to take to get to San Diego.

Nominated a barely- C-grade undergrad degree basket case as head of the Department of Energy, just five years after that same whack-a-doodle swore he’d get rid of that very same department.

Nominated a FOP (Friend of Putin), who heads an oil company with significant financial interest in Russia (Putin’s Russia) as Secretary of State.

And his kids and their business versus transition responsibilities – can’t even get into that without endangering my eyes. They’ll roll right the fuck out of my head.

But, on the good side, I was fortunate enough to stay healthy, as did my family. Into Tordon was published and has been getting good reviews. After a few dry months the writing juices started flowing again and I’m only a couple of months behind delivering book ELEVEN. (I really need to take a breath and figure out how to market these things.)

And my full-time job, while incredible demanding from a time and mental point of view is also incredibly rewarding.

So, 2016, take a flying leap at the moon and bring on 2017. I’ve got $20 on a July impeachment.

 

A corollary to my previous post (make sure your first draft sucks) is that you need to trust yourself.

I’ve finished Act Two. (As if. It’s not “finished”. The first draft is finished. But, that said, all of the story that needed to be told before the second plot point has been told.)

I know pretty much how Act Three ends. Pretty much. It can change. I know who the hero needs to defeat first, I know how the hero will discover who the actual antagonist is (everyone up to that point have been henchmen) and that’s it.

Once sentence, thirty-two words and from that I will write about 20,000 words for Act Three. If you write, you’ve all been in this position. And if you write, you’ve probably been in this position, watching a cursor blink on your screen while you figure out what words to use.

Here’s my advice: Use any words you want.

I am a strong advocate for plotting. Those thirty-two words above are all the plotting you need for Act Three. Trust yourself. It’s the first draft. You’ll have some good stuff and you’ll have some absolute shit, but that doesn’t matter. It’s. The. First. Draft.

Just write. Right?

It’s common knowledge that you can’t write a book without finishing the first draft. It is also common knowledge, or it should be, that your first draft will always be crap.

Seriously.

And you’d think after eleven books I’d remember this. It’s been taking me forever to complete the first draft of book number twelve. It’s got great characters, it’s set in a colourful place and the story is pretty much broken. So what’s the problem?

I’ve forgotten that the first draft can be crap. Should be crap. In fact, I think it’s safe to say that if your first draft isn’t crap, you’re not doing it right. Or write.

And that’s been my problem.

It occurred me today that, despite the history I have writing, I’m trying to produce a publishable first draft. That’s just stupid.

So I think it’s useful to review Tony’s Essential Rules of Writing a First Draft.

Tony’s Essential Rules of Writing a First Draft.

  1. Spend a serious amount of time not writing, making sure you’ve figured out the story, where it ends, where it starts, what the key plot points are.
  2. Write. As frequently as possible.
  3. Continue writing until you’ve finished the story.
  4. Do not give a rat’s ass about spelling, grammar or character names while writing
  5. Aren’t you listening? Forget about the spelling.
  6. Remember Point 3. Finished the damned thing, then worry about the stuff in point 4.
  7. Remember that even JK Rowling wrote a shitty first draft.

Easy, right? Write.

23. September 2016 · Write a comment · Categories: writing · Tags:

The year is ending with a bang, writing-wise.

Into Tordon.cover.draft.25 July 2016In October (the 21st, to be exact) I and a number of co-authors will launch “Into Tordon“, a middle-grade thriller, at Balgowlah Berkelouw at 6pm. This book is the result of a collaboration with eight other authors from the Northern Beaches Writers’ Group and has been described in our first review as “… pacy, exciting read that middle-grade readers will love getting sucked into.”

I don’t disagree. It was a blast to write, and I’m sure any 10-14 year old will love it. (If they do, it’s all the fault of Zoya and Zena, the impeccable editors.)

“Into Tordon” will be released nationwide on the 1st of November. A perfect Christmas gift.

In November (date will be confirmed later) we release another collaborative effort from the good old NBWG. “A Fearsome Engine” is an anthology of short stories written by members of the group. All of the shorts are related by the theme of man interacting with machines. More details at this space (and many others) closer to the date.

And in December I’ll have the first draft of “Hot Blood” (current title, likely to change a couple of dozen times before I’m finished) ready for Beta readers. It’s a follow on from “Mac D: Private Investigator”, taking place four months after the end of that book.

If you want to be a Beta reader, leave a comment below.

Hang on there, partner!

There have been a lot of people (or one person a whole hell of a lot of times) left-clicking on the “right click this link” link below. That’s not going to get you anything but a screen full or gibberish.

Right click that link (like it says), select “Save Link as” and save it somewhere. Anywhere. Just remember where that “anywhere” is.

Then follow the rest of the directions.

Okay, then. Back to your regularly followed episode.

So if you’ve been adopting the story structure model I’ve been pushing – it’s one of many similar and equally valid models – and you use Scrivener to write your fiction (if you don’t, check it out. It’s worth it.) then have I got a deal for you.

If you right click this link and save the file in a location you can’t forget (let’s go for desktop, for now), and if you follow the steps below, you’ll have yourself a Scrivener Template that takes the story structure I’ve been writing about and “operationalises it”. (Sorry, a term from work that I can’t abide – need to get it out of my system.)

The template breaks your manuscript into thirty-six chapters over four parts. Act One, the two halves of Act Two, and Act Three. Pinch Points are highlighted as are suggested locations for the Inciting Incident and All is Lost moment. Details of what all these mean are found at my Structure page.

So, have you right-clicked and saved the link above for the template? Good.

The screenshots below are for the Mac OS version — and the template is for the latest version of Scrivener (Scrivener 2.8.0). This is the version that allows you to use Dropbox and synchronise between the Mac OS and iOS devices (running the extremely slick mobile version of Scrivener).

When you start a new Scrivener project, you’re presented with a window that allows you to select a template. Bottom left of that window is an “Options” button that allows you to import a template:

importtemplate

Click on the “Import Templates” link and navigate to the place you stored the template (I saved it on the desktop)

importtemplate2

Select it and “Import”, then click on the “Fiction” category. The template with be there, and you can follow the usual steps for starting a new project – except this time with a template that contains the structure found in pretty much every successful book and movie created over the past century.

4partnovel

As always, leave comments if you have any questions.

If you have the PC version and want to send me some “equivalent” screenshots, I’ll update this post and give you credit. Just leave a comment below and I’ll send you an email to arrange.

27. August 2016 · Write a comment · Categories: writing · Tags:

Into Tordon.cover.draft.25 July 2016_sml Mark the 21st of October in your calendar. It’s a Friday, and on that Friday, from 6:00 to 7:30 in the evening I’ll be in Balgowlah, at the Berkelouw bookstore at Stocklands, with a bunch of fellow writers, launching “Into Tordan”.

I am one of the “T”s who make up Z.F. Kingbolt. We are an autonomous collective of authors from the Northern Beaches Writers’ Group who decided the Write-A-Book-In-A-Day exercise wasn’t enough fun and spread it over three years. Ten writers, illustrators and editors put this book together, and it is, we’ve been told, “…a pacy exciting read that middle-grade readers will love getting sucked into.” (That’s from a review by Books+Publishing.)

“Into Tordon”  follows Bethlyn and a fellow gamer Zane as they get sucked into an alternate reality – a number of alternate realities, in fact. They need to use their gaming skills against myriad foes to survive and make it back home, learning a lot about themselves, and the importance of teamwork and trust along their journey.

Most of ZF Kingbolt will be at the launch, so stop by, say hi, and pick up a book or two for your middle-grade kids/nieces/nephews/friends.

Also, we’re delighted that Susanne Gervay will be helping us launch the book. Pop by and say hi to her, too.